Tools
slide hammer.jpg
slide hammer.jpg
A slide hammer is a pretty simple tool that works well. By drilling a hole in the dent you can screw the end of the shaft into the hole then slide the weight on the shaft to pull out the dent. There are many trick to using a slide hammer that are learned with time but the best advice is don't try to pull the dent out all at once. Go slow and attack it from many angles and it will come out pretty good. A slide hammer set can be had for about $40.

snips.jpg
snips.jpg
The red ones are for right handed cuts, the yellow for straight and the green for left handed cuts, everybody got it now? Buy a good set of snips as the cheap ones dull quickly and are pretty worthless. A good set will run you $30-$50

hammer1.jpg
hammer1.jpg
You can't have too many hammers and a nice small set like this will come in handy when forming metal for patches or getting into close work where a little bump is needed. A set like this can be had for $25.

hammer2.jpg
hammer2.jpg
Like I said you can't have too many hammers. A good set of ball-peen hammers will be used almost every day during the metal phase of your project. These have fiberglass handles, I prefer wood but whatever works for you is cool too. I have seen this set for as low as $9

spotweld.jpg
spotweld.jpg
If you are doing any bodywork get used to this tool they are absolutely the best way to separate two spot-welded pieces of metal. I bought a set from Snap On and they have drilled out over a thousand spot welds and are still sharp. The trick is to drill an 1/8"pilot hole and dip the cutter is oil before drilling. Don't scrimp on the quality here buy a good set and you will be rewarded. The Snap On set I bought had four cutters and set me back $85.

arrow.jpg
arrow.jpg
This is a magnet shaped like an arrowhead and it holds metal together while you weld. I bought mine for $5 and it came in very handy many times. They also make these in various sizes.

helmet.jpg
helmet.jpg
How important is your vision? If you are of the same mold as me it is very important because you can't drive you muscle car if you are blind. Welding helmets make a great step forward with the advent of the self-darkening window. An LCD screen senses the spark of the welder and darkens to block out the bad light but then snaps back to a lighter shade so you can see what the hell you did. This is such a great improvement over the old flip-up visors especially when you are tack welding and you need to see between welds. The other great thing is they are very light and will not get in the way too much. The prices on these have really dropped with helmets available in the $100 range.

welder1.jpg
welder1.jpg
Don't laugh at my welder because it welded all the panels on my car and never complained once. Actually this is the model that I used because I got it new in a trade for some things and it did not cost me a cent. I added the gas kit and was off to the races. Actually, if I was going to do it again I would get a larger welder so it can be more flexible but always use a gas do not attempt to weld with flux-core wire. It is messy and gives you poor welds. A 110v welder will do pretty big jobs and sure is a lot easier to use where you need it instead of worrying about having 220 where you go. Lincoln, Century, Hobart and Miller are all good brands to look at. By the way if you want to go the way I did this little baby will only set you back $279 with the gas kit.

schutz.jpg
schutz.jpg
Trying to get the correct texture of the factory undercoating is near impossible without one of these. It is called a Schutz gun and it attaches to a can of undercoating and gives you the rough texture that the factory sprayed on. I always saw these for about $80 and could never bring myself to spend that and then I ran across this one for $14 at Harbor Freight Tools and snatched it up. They also sell the 1-quart cans of undercoating for $19 for a case of four. Makes sure you put a regulator on the gun and spray at about 10-15 lbs for the correct texture.

hvlp big.jpg
hvlp big.jpg
Less over spray, better coverage and it uses less paint are the biggest advantages of the HVLP (high volume low pressure) types of spray guns. These guns spray at about 30-40 lbs instead of 70 lbs of the old style of guns so the paint goes where you want it to go not into the air and your lungs. Since I was not going to shoot the final paint on my car I looked for a nice gun for primer and came up with a lot of choices from $59-$129. If you are going to attempt the paint yourself be sure to get the correct nozzle sizes for primer, base coat and clear, as they will vary. Make sure you have a good water trap in the system and all your lines are clean and your connections tight and not leaking.


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